A Love Letter to the Internet, Maybe

A Love Letter to the Internet, Maybe

I was born in the ripe year of 1998, too young to feel the existential fear of Y2K, but old enough to be introduced to the weird and conceptual world of The Internet.

I think it was around 2005 when I first started to grasp the concept of the Internet. It didn’t exist much in my house, besides an early dial-up memory I have as a child of seeing a website for the first time. But around 2008 when YouTube was a very bland and diluted version of the giant it is today, was when I can recall the start of what has led to a very intense and maybe unhealthy experience with the World Wide Web.

I have a disdain for a lot of websites in 2019. I don’t know if it’s because I have some sentiment towards the past, and these old kitsch pages help me to travel back to a simpler time, or just because modern sites truly are in fact, awful and lifeless 1s and 0s! Most websites I see today are so streamlined and featureless that it’s devoid of any life or passion that their web ancestors had plenty of.

// Photo: John Latham

// Photo: John Latham

I think today that charm and quirk is exploited, a lot of videos on YouTube are packaged as candid and genuine but almost radiate a feeling of insincerity, fueled by clickbait and monetisation.

I spend most of my Internet-time on YouTube and Instagram - which is not unique in anyway whatsoever, but I look back on YouTube as a place that used to be home to a lot of weird but charming videos, from the bedroom of some teenager who didn’t know that the whole world could see them if they were so inclined to search around! I think today that charm and quirk is exploited, a lot of videos on YouTube are packaged as candid and genuine but almost radiate a feeling of insincerity, fueled by click-bait and monetisation. If used ironically and with a degree of self-awareness, I think it can be fun though!

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It could be due to the fact that I am cynical with everything online but I think you can tell if something seems forced or not.

It works just the same with social media too I feel. You can be infinitely scrolling past accounts and accounts of people who are molding their lives in a way that favours a double tap, or a heart reaction. I like to see Instagram as a place where I can be the most exaggerated version of myself if I want to be, and being weird and creative with what you do on this very over-saturated platform is healthy and refreshing. It could be due to the fact that I am cynical with everything online but I think you can tell if something seems forced or not.

Although blasting the Internet with criticism is something I find quite relaxing, I do genuinely feel with my lil’ heart that it’s a place unlike anything ever, and it does have a lot of lovely curves and edges too, if you look at it the right way! The Internet is a nice friend most of the time who can tell you fun facts, show you fun videos, give you opportunities to meet new friends ‘n lovers and give you a sense of place in a very very big world, and for that I love ya.

 But not the dark web, I don’t like that.

Pizzagirl


Pizzagirl - For the Record Bio Photo

About Pizzagirl

From the confines of his bedroom studio (AKA The Beatzzeria) in Liverpool, Pizzagirl’s musical mind wanders through the decades and over the Atlantic. Capturing the wistful, romantic reminiscence and coming-of-age sentiment in classic Brat Pack era films it’s as though Pizzagirl has planted himself as a character in a John Hughes screenplay.

Overall it’s a small operation. With the help of a thrown together flat-pack mini studio, Pizzagirl writes, records and produces all of his music and visuals from the comfort of his home. His best mate shoots his videos and his mum takes his press shots.